Iago- Put your finger on your lips and silence yourself and listen to what I have to say. The excessive love which Desdemona has proclaimed for the Moor is only because of his bragging and fictitious stories. Do you really expect her to love him for his continual bragging? Surely in your heart, you can’t believe that! She needs a better looking man; what delight will she get from looking upon Othello? When the relationship grows boring after much intercourse, there must be something to sustain her desires, which includes handsomeness, youth and similarities to her; all of which the Moor lacks. She will yearn for these things and her youthful impressionability will feel cheated, causing her to find the Moor repulsive. Nature itself will make her do it and compel her to find another suitor. Now because of this (which I have undoubtedly proven), who is most likely to be her next choice more than Cassio? A crafty rogue, could he be not aware of putting on a polite and chivalrous mannerism to achieve his hidden passion? Of course not! He is a deceitful man who attempts to take advantage of situations (even if the advantages are not presented) A devilish fiend! Besides, he is handsome, young and that make him very attractive to silly and “green” girls. His rogue behaviour has already gained the attention of Desdemona.

Roderigo- I don’t believe that about her; she is too virtuous.

Iago- Whatever! She is no more valiant than anyone else. If she was so virtuous, she would have never loved Othello. My God! Did you not see her fondly holding Cassio’s hand? Did you not observe it?

Roderigo- Yes I did, but it was merely out of courtesy.

Iago- Evil doing by his actions! This was just a glimpse into the lust and desire they have for each other; they are surely lovers. They were so close to each other that their breaths exchanged. Adulterous actions, Roderigo! By these displays of intimacy, their love will only lead to intercourse; it’s the only logical conclusion. Pish! Take my advice; I am the one who convinced you to come to Cyprus from Venice. Be vigilant tonight. I have a job for you: Cassio doesn’t know you; I will be nearby. You must find a way to anger Cassio, either by speaking too loud or insulting his military skills, or whatever action you see fit.

Roderigo- Ok.

Iago: He is quick to anger and may try to hit you with his officer’s baton; attempt to make him do so. From these actions I will rally the support of Cyprus against Cassio and his qualifications as Lieutenant will be discredited and he will be discharged. This will make your journey shorter in getting what you want, and I will advance your cause; if we can’t get Cassio out of the way then there is no chance of us succeeding.

Roderigo: I will aid in this plan if you provide me with the opportunity to do so.

Iago: I assure you. Meet me in a while at the citadel. I have to get Othello’s luggage. Goodbye

Roderigo: Goodbye

Iago: I strongly believe that Cassio loves Desdemona; and this love is probably reciprocated by Desdemona. The Moor (Who I cannot stand) is of a dependable, loving and noble nature; I believe he will be a good husband to Desdemona. I also love her too, not out of purely lust (which is very sinful) but also out of revenge, because I suspect that the Moor has slept with my wife. The idea of this is agonizing and constantly troubling me on the inside; nothing will bring me to peace until I get even with him and sleep with his wife. If I fail to do so, I can at least make him so jealous that he cannot pass judgment correctly. If this worthless person of Venice (Roderigo), whom I control with a lease, can execute my plan, then Michael Cassio will fall. I will discredit Cassio’s good reputation by slandering him to Othello and I also suspect Cassio of seducing my wife. I will get in good favour with the Moor, who will love and reward me, even though I will be manipulating him the entire time. My master plan is sound; however its conclusion has yet to be seen.

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

avatar
wpDiscuz