Comparative Film Analysis: Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner & Guess Who

They say “love conquers all”, but when the couple in love have two different racial backgrounds, that’s when the trouble starts. In 1967, racial prejudice was prominently significant, but Director Stanley Kramer wanted to address the problem head-on. In his movie “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” the issues of racism, prejudice, and interracial marriage are…

Colley Cibber’s Richard III: Summary & Analysis

Colley Cibber was a comic actor and playwright with pretensions to tragedy (Colley 17-18). In 1700, he wrote and performed in an altered and slightly abridged version of Shakespeare’s Richard III, which was initially unsuccessful (probably because of overzealous government censorship) (Ashley 52). However, it soon became popular enough to eclipse the Shakespearean original on…

Janet E. Smith’s Fig Leaves and Falsehoods: Summary & Analysis

In “Fig Leaves and Falsehoods,” Janet E. Smith argues against the consensus view of Catholic moralists who, following Aquinas, regard all deceptive speech as morally wrong.  She maintains that Aquinas’s view depends on an overly limited view of the purpose of speech, a view based on a prelapsarian order of things and neglectful of the…