Tutor and Freelance Writer. Science Teacher and Lover of Essays. Article last reviewed: 2019 | St. Rosemary Institution © 2010-2020 | Creative Commons 4.0

Tim Winton’s “The Riders”: Pete Keneally & Jimmy Brereton Analysis

Tim Winton’s novel “The Riders” is a very detailed novel about being a father and being a husband. The protagonist, Mr. Fred Scully, more commonly known as Scully encounter and overcomes his main disappointment of losing his beloved wife, Jennifer. Jennifer runs away from this family leaving Scully and his daughter, Billy, behind together. One…

Telnet: History, Purpose, Advantages, Disadvantages

Before gophers, hypertext, and sophisticated web browsers, telnet was the primary means by which computer users connected their machines with other computers around the world. Telnet is a plain ASCII terminal emulation protocol that is still used to access a variety of information sources, most notably libraries and local BBS’s. This report will trace the…

Medieval Minstrels: History & Traveling Thespians

Minstrels, or traveling thespians, thrived throughout Europe in medieval times. The term minstrel referred to a professional entertainer of any kind from the 12th century to the 17th century. Minstrels were instrumentalist, but were also often jugglers, acrobats, and storytellers. Although minstrels no longer exist, they played an important role in medieval history and, at…

T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”: Poem & Analysis

T.S. Eliot’s  “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” is a melancholy poem of one man’s frustrated search to find the meaning of his existence.  The speaker’s strong use of imagery contributes to the poem’s theme of communion and loneliness. The Poem begins with an invitation from Prufrock to follow him through his self-examination. The…